Vegetarian Dish

vegetarian dish paired with gsm wine

This vegetarian dish paired with a dry rosé wine is the perfect meal for any day of the week. This recipe is easy to make and can be prepared in just 30 minutes!

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Vegetarian dish paired with gsm wine

At Plant & Vine, we’re all about pairing wine with plant-based, vegan, and vegetarian meals. Our goal is to deconstruct traditional food narratives by breaking beyond formulaic meat and wine pairings. Let’s dive in.

Understanding Wine Pairing

Wine pairing - hand holding a glass of red wine.There are five fundamental components to all wines. It’s helpful to think of wine pairings in relationship to these components and how they interact with the nuances of the food on your plate. The goal of a great wine pairing is to balance the wine’s qualities with the food’s qualities, in a way that highlights each partner’s greatness.

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Think of wine and food pairings like a relationship — you don’t want two identical copies of the same person; it’s all about finding a pairing that complements each other’s differences. Throughout your life, you can date many different types of people or you can stick to “your type” for life. The same options are true in the wine pairing and food world. There are lots of different pairings for every dish and every wine. The fun part of learning about wine is developing your taste and senses so you decide what tastes best to you.

Basic Wine Characteristics

The five basic wine characteristics are:

  1. Sweetness: Any residual sugar remaining from the fermentation process will make a wine taste sweeter. If two wines have the same amount of sugar in them, the wine with lower acidity will taste sweeter than the higher acidity wine.
  2. Acidity: Acidity in wine comes from tartaric, malic, and citric acid from the grapes. Acidity is responsible for the perceived tartness or crispness in wine. As grapes ripen, they become less acidic (and more sugary). Therefore, wines from cooler climates are typically more acidic because the grapes have a difficult time ripening in the cooler temperatures.
  3. Tannin: Tannin is a polyphenol found in grape skins and seeds. Because red wine is fermented with grape skins, it has tannins whereas white wine does not. Tannins create a mouth-drying feeling on the tongue or gums, which helps with palate cleaning.
  4. Alcohol: Alcohol is made from yeast converting grape sugar into ethanol. Alcohol adds body to wines, with bigger bodied wines typically having higher alcohol contents. Alcohol also registers as a burning sensation in the throat.
  5. Body: The difference between a light and full-bodied wine is similar to the difference between skim and full milk. Lighter wines tend to be more acidic, lower alcohol, less tannic, and less sweet whereas bolder wines tend to be less acidic, higher alcohol, more tannic, and more sweet.

Now that we have a common wine language, let’s chat about how these qualities interplay with food.

Wine Pairing Principles

There are two main theories behind pairings: congruent and complementary. In congruent wine pairings, there is a strong overlap of flavor compounds between the food and wine, which intensifies the overlapping qualities. In complementary pairings, there are only a few shared flavor compounds between the food and wine, which means you’re going for contrast and balance (Source).

Another great option for wine pairings is to pick wines based on the region of the cuisine. For example, if you are cooking a Moroccan chickpea dish, try a wine from Spain, Italy, or the southern coast of France. Spices of a particular region tend to develop around what the climate makes available, which also holds true for the grapes that grow nearby. That being said, don’t feel like you need to automatically rule out any United States, Australia, or Eastern European wines with your Moroccan chickpea dish. Wines from similar climates the world over can likely pair nicely with your dinner.

Wine Pairing Examples

Congruent Wine Pairing: A creamy cashew-based sauce with pasta paired with an oaked Chardonnay from California. The buttery flavors from the oak aging create a soft wine that supports the creaminess in the dish. If an unoaked Chardonnay that was very crisp and acidic was chosen instead, this would create a complementary wine pairing.

Complementary Wine Pairing: Pairing the same creamy cashew-based pasta dish above with an unoaked Chardonnay or a bright New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. The bright crispness and acidity in either of these wine pairings would contrast with the fat from the cashew sauce, giving the tongue two very different flavor profiles and mouthfeels.

Food and Wine Pairing Tips

  • Acidic Food: match with high-acid wines. Lower acidity wines will taste flat.
    • Food examples: citrus or balsamic vinaigrette, tomato-based sauces
  • Rich Food: match with high tannin reds or high acid whites for their palate cleansing effects with fat.
    • Food examples: nut-based sauces, macaroni and cheese, vegan cheesecake, curries
  • Spicy Food: match with low alcohol or sweet wines to reduce the burning sensation in your mouth.
    • Food examples: salsa, spicy curries, hot sauce, horseradish-based sauces
  • Bitter Food: match with low to no-tannin or sweet wines. Tannic wines will increase the bitterness.
    • Food examples: kale, grapefruit, arugula, dark chocolate
  • Sweet Food: match with sweet wines. Sweet food will often make a regular dry wine taste more bitter.
    • Food examples: cakes, cookies, fudge, milk chocolate, ice cream
  • Salty Food: match with acidic or fruity wines.
    • Food examples: popcorn, pretzel, mixed nuts, tortilla chips

Read more: Vegan Mashed Potatoes | Easy Recipe

When pairing, go for balance between your food and wine pairings. Pair lighter wines with lighter dishes and bolder wines with heavier dishes. Match weight with weight, intensity with intensity, and aromatics with aromatics. Also consider the meal — as Karen MacNeil, author of the classic tome The Wine Bible, said, “Pair great with great, humble with humble.” You don’t need a fancy expensive bottle of wine every week (although it would be nice!).

Vegan Food and Wine Pairing Overview

We have officially covered the basics of how to pair wines with foods. Now, let’s dive into the specifics of wine pairings with vegan (and vegetarian foods). When you have a vegan or vegetarian dish, focus on pairing with the most prominent flavors. For example, if you have spaghetti with a tomato sauce, focus on the acidic tomato flavors. If you have a vegan bowl with veggies, tofu, and a cashew based sauce, focus on the nutty creaminess of the cashew sauces (Source). Using More specifics below:

  • Green Vegetables (avocados, kale, broccoli, green beans)
    • Pair with sparkling or light whites
  • Root Vegetables (carrots, squash, pumpkin, sweet potato, potato)
    • Pair with full-bodied white, aromatic white, rosé, or light red
  • Alliums (garlic, onion, shallots)
    • Dream big here. Will pair with almost anything.
  • Nightshades (tomato, eggplant, bell peppers)
    • Pair with aromatic white, rosé, medium red, full-bodied red
  • Beans (black, lentil, pinto, white)
    • Pair with sparkling, rosé, light red, medium red
  • Fungi (Chanterelle, Crimini, Maitake, Shitake)
    • Pair with full-bodied white, light red, medium red, full-bodied red
  • Nuts (peanut, almond, pecan, cashew)
    • Pair with aromatic white, rosé, or dessert wine
  • Fresh Herbs (basil, cilantro, dill, mint)
    • Pair with sparkling wine, light white, full-bodied white, aromatic white, rosé, light red
  • Pepper (Chipotle, Chili, Ancho)
    • Pair with sparkling wine, aromatic white, rosé, or medium red

The vegan food and wine pairing guidelines above are meant to serve as high-level reference points for thinking through your pairing decisions. On Plant & Vine, I suggest particular varietals of wine for each recipe where a wine pairing would be appropriate. I encourage you to check out some recipes for examples of specific wine pairings.

Is Decanting Wine Necessary?

If you drink wine on a regular basis, a wine decanter is a good investment. It’s easy to end up with more kitchen accessories than cabinets, but a decanter serves a truly unique value that you won’t find in say, a bagel slicer. Decanting wine involves the simple act of pouring wine from its original vessel, the bottle, to a container with more breathing room.

By decanting the wine, you achieve two goals – increasing oxygen exposure and reducing sediment prior to serving.

Increasing the oxygen exposure improves taste by softening tannins, letting out any residual sulfur dioxide, releasing any sharp, volatile, or overly acidic aromas, and perhaps more importantly, letting the wine’s fruit and floral aromas shine. Decanting helps wine smell and taste better, elevating an otherwise average wine experience into a great one.

Want to learn more about wine decanters? Check out the best wine decanters.

6 Wine Pairing Tips

Wine pairing tips - swirling red wine in a decanter before serving.

  1. Rosé is delightful with almost any food pairing. If you’re stressing out and don’t know what to do, get a dry rosé.
  2. Pinot Noir is an earthy, light red wine that pairs great with other earthy vegan foods. When you’re eating a Portobello burger or pasta with tahini sauce, you can confidently reach for a glass of Pinot Noir.
  3. Champagne (and other sparkling wines) aren’t just for special occasions. They’re exceptional palate cleaners which means they pair well with fatty dishes where you need to wake up your tongue.
  4. When dealing with extremely vegetal culprits (asparagus, artichokes, avocado), lean into the vegetal, crisp profile of white wines like Sauvignon Blanc to complement and highlight the greenness of the dish.
  5. If you have a heavily spiced or peppery dish, go light and sweet so you don’t increase the mouth burn. Try a crisp, sweet Riesling or Gewürztraminer.
  6. Wines should be more acidic and sweeter than the food. Otherwise, you risk the wine tasting flabby or bitter.

White Wine Pairing

White wine pairings are most common for plant-based foods, largely because old school wine pairing rules emphasized red with meat and whites with veggies. This mantra is largely outdated and it’s better to focus on sweetness, acidity, and body of the wine and how it interacts with the dish. White wine is incredibly diverse, spanning from crisp or heavy to honey or lemon to bone dry or sweet. Below is an overview of main white wines and vegan food pairings:

Albariño Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Spain / Portugal
  • Flavors: lemon, grapefruit, nectarine, melon
  • Pairs well with these foods: Thai, Moroccan, Indian cuisine
  • Try it with: Vegan Burrito Bowl

Chardonnay Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: yellow apple, starfruit, pineapple, butter, chalk
  • Pairs well with these foods: avocado, cheese (Brie, Gouda, Jack), butter or cream sauce dishes, squash, vegetables
  • Try it with: Creamy Avocado Pasta

Chenin Blanc Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: lemon, yellow apple, pear, honey, chamomile
  • Pairs well with these foods: apples and apple desserts, Chinese cuisine, fried foods, Mexican cuisine, salad, spicy dishes, vegetables
  • Try it with: Easy Vegan Falafel

Gewürztraminer Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: low
  • Origin: Germany and France
  • Flavors: lychee, rose, grapefruit, tangerine, guava
  • Pairs well with these foods: Asian, Indian, Thai cuisine, smoked foods, curries, ginger, aged cheese, desserts
  • Try it with: Vegan Fried Rice

Grüner Veltliner Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Austria
  • Flavors: yellow apple, green pear, green bean, white pepper, lime
  • Pairs well with these foods: Aromatic and vegetal vegetables (Asparagus), tofu, Japanese cuisine
  • Try it with: Kale Salad with Roasted Chickpea Croutons

Muscadet Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Loire, France
  • Flavors: lime, lemon, green apple, pear, seashell
  • Pairs well with these foods: pickled foods, fried foods, salad, citrus vinaigrettes

Pinot Grigio Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: France and Italy
  • Flavors: lemon, yellow apple, melon, nectarine, peach
  • Pairs well with these foods: salad, smoked cheese, spicy food, grilled vegetables
  • Try it with: Vegan Palak Paneer

Riesling Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Germany
  • Flavors: lime, green apple, beeswax, jasmine, petroleum
  • Pairs well with these foods: Indian, Vietnamese, and Thai cuisine, spicy foods, blue cheese, summer fruit, salad, desserts
  • Try it with: Banh Mi Bowl with Crispy Tofu

Sauvignon Blanc Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: gooseberry, green melon, grapefruit, grass, white peach, passionfruit
  • Pairs well with these foods: artichokes, asparagus, cheese (Brie, Feta, Goat), Mexican cuisine, cilantro, peppers, salad
  • Try it with: Sweet Potato Quinoa Salad

Soave Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Veneto, Italy
  • Flavors: preserved lemon, honeydew melon, salt, green almond
  • Pairs well with these foods: lentils, asparagus, goat cheese, salad, pesto, lighter pizzas
  • Try it with: Vegan Zucchini Bread

Viognier Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: low
  • Origin: Southern France
  • Flavors: tangerine, peach, mango, honeysuckle, rose
  • Pairs well with these foods: artichokes, butter and cream sauces, curries, Indian cuisine, roasted red peppers, Thai Food, mushrooms
  • Try it with: Tali Sauce Vegan Bowl

Red Wine Pairing

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A lot of people love drinking red wine with dinner. Red wine is typically a heavier wine – fuller bodied and higher alcohol content – which pairs nicely with traditionally heavier dinner meals. Given the outdated logic that red wine only goes with meat, not everyone feels confident pairing red wine with vegan or vegetarian dishes. Take comfort in knowing that red wine pairings can span from light and fruity, bold and leathery, or velvety to crisp, which makes pairing much more straightforward than one might think. Below is an overview of main red wines and vegan food pairings:

Beaujolais Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: medium to high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: huckleberry, raspberry, violet, soil, banana
  • Pairs well with these foods: cheese (goat, Brie, cheddar), pasta with light sauces, brunch, curries, mushrooms, pizza, salads, spicy dishes, roasted vegetables
  • Try it with: Banh Mi Bowl with Crispy Tofu

Bordeaux Blend Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: plum, black currant, violet, graphite, cedar
  • Pairs well with these foods: barbecued food, tofu, aged cheese (Cheddar or Gouda)
  • Try it with: Mushroom Lentil Soup with Kale

Cabernet Franc Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: medium to high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: strawberry, roasted pepper, red plum, gravel, chili pepper
  • Pairs well with these foods: cabbage, eggplant, red sauce pasta, bell peppers, pizza, tomato, roasted vegetables
  • Try it with: Vegan Green Bean Casserole

Cabernet Sauvignon Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: black cherry, black currant, red bell pepper, baking spices, cedar
  • Pairs well with these foods: cheese (Brie, Camembert, Gorgonzola), dark chocolate, veggie burgers, mint, mushroom risotto, grilled vegetables, walnuts
  • Try it with: Vegan Tomato Soup

Grenache Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: Spain
  • Flavors: dried strawberry, grilled plum, grapefruit, leather, licorice
  • Pairs well with these foods: barbecue, eggplant, mushrooms, pizza, Moroccan cuisine, spicy dishes
  • Try it with: Gallo Pinto with Mango Salsa

GSM Blend Pairing (Grenache-Syrah-Mourvèdre)

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: medium to high
  • Origin: Côtes du Rhône, France
  • Flavors: raspberry, blackberry, dried green herbs, baking spices, lavender
  • Pairs well with these foods: Mexican cuisine, root vegetables, vegetable stew
  • Try it with: Vegan Baked Ziti

Malbec Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: Southwest France
  • Flavors: red plum, blueberry, vanilla, sweet tobacco, cocoa
  • Pairs well with these foods: barbecued foods, chili, fajitas, Indian cuisine, pizza, spicy dishes
  • Try it with: Moroccan Chickpea Stew

Merlot Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: raspberry, black cherry, sugar plum, chocolate, cedar
  • Pairs well with these foods: blue cheese, cranberries, grilled mushrooms, tomato sauce pasta, vegetable stew, tomato sauce
  • Try it with: Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

Montepulciano Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: medium to high
  • Origin: Southern Italy
  • Flavors: red plum, oregano, sour cherry, boysenberry, tar
  • Pairs well with these foods: grilled mushrooms, pasta with tomato or mushroom sauce, pizza, mushroom risotto, vegetable stews
  • Try it with: Vegan Baked Ziti

Nebbiolo Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Northern Italy
  • Flavors: rose, cherry, leather, clay pot, anise
  • Pairs well with these foods: cheese, mushrooms, tomato-based sauces
  • Try it with: Vegan Cream of Mushroom Soup

Pinot Noir Pairing

  • Body: light to medium
  • Acid: medium to high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: cranberry, cherry, raspberry, clove, mushroom
  • Pairs well with these foods: beets, cheese (goat, Brie, feta), eggplant, fennel, mushrooms, truffles, root vegetables
  • Try it with: Broccoli Cauliflower Pasta with Tahini Sauce

Sangiovese Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Italy
  • Flavors: red currant, roasted tomato, raspberry, clay pot
  • Pairs well with these foods: cheese, eggplant, fresh herbs, mushrooms, pasta with tomato sauce, roasted bell peppers, pizza, zucchini, Italian cuisine
  • Try it with: Green Chile Vegan Mac and Cheese

Syrah Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: blueberry, plum, milk chocolate, tobacco, green peppercorn
  • Pairs well with these foods: barbecued foods, casseroles, cheese (Gouda, Parmesan), chili, grilled eggplant, veggie burgers with ketchup, mushrooms, rich pastas, ratatouille
  • Try it with: Easy Vegan Fried Rice

Tempranillo Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Spain
  • Flavors: cherry, dried fig, cedar, tobacco, dill
  • Pairs well with these foods: beans, cheese, lentils, roasted root vegetables, mushrooms
  • Try it with: Vegan Pupusas with Beans and Cheese

Touriga Nacional Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Portugal
  • Flavors: violet, blueberry, plum, mint, slate
  • Pairs well with these foods: cheese (Swiss, Blue, Brie), roasted cauliflower, beans, lentils
  • Try it with: Black Bean Bowl with Plantains

Zinfandel Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: low
  • Origin: Croatia
  • Flavors: blackberry, strawberry, peach preserves, baking spices, tobacco
  • Pairs well with these foods: Asian cuisine, cheese (Blue, feta), eggplant, Mexican cuisine, olives, baked pastas, pizza, root vegetables, spicy dishes
  • Try it with: Vegan Burrito Bowl

Sparking Wine Pairing

For a long time, I thought sparkling wine was reserved only for fancy occasions. As I’ve learned more about wine, I’ve been happy to be proven wrong. Sparkling wine pairs perfectly with lots of different vegan and vegetarian dishes with its crisp lightness and palate cleansing bubbles. Below is an overview of the main sparkling wines and vegan food pairings:

Cava Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Spain
  • Flavors: quince, lime, yellow apple, pear, almond
  • Pairs well with these foods: barbecued foods, Chinese cuisine, desserts, fried foods, Japanese cuisine, salad, vegetarian sushi
  • Try it with: Vegan Buckwheat Pancakes

Champagne Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Champagne, France
  • Flavors: citrus, peach, white cherry, almond, toast
  • Pairs well with these foods: appetizers, asparagus, butter or cream sauces, Chinese cuisine, vegetarian curries, fried food, Indian cuisine, Japanese cuisine, mushrooms, peaches, vegetarian sushi
  • Try it with: Creamy Avocado Pasta

Lambrusco Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Northern Italy
  • Flavors: strawberry, cherry, rhubarb, hibiscus
  • Pairs well with these foods: Ricotta cheese, pasta, pizza, balsamic vinaigrette
  • Try it with: Green Chile Vegan Mac and Cheese

Prosecco Pairing

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Northern Italy
  • Flavors: green apple, honeydew melon, pear, honeysuckle, cream
  • Pairs well with these foods: Thai cuisine, Vietnamese cuisine, almonds, asparagus, Chinese cuisine, salad
  • Try it with: Tofu Sofritas in a Spicy Burrito Bowl

Dessert Wine Pairing

Dessert wines range from off-dry to very sweet. They can be fruity when they’re young or develop nutty, honeyed, and caramel flavor profiles as they age. Below is an overview of the main sparkling wines and vegan food pairings:

Madeira Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Madeira Island, Portugal
  • Flavors: burnt caramel, walnut oil, peach, hazelnut, orange zest
  • Pairs well with these foods: almonds and almond desserts, bananas and banana desserts, milk chocolate, chocolate desserts, custards, pecans and pecan desserts, pumpkin desserts
  • Try it with: Vegan Snickerdoodles

Port Pairing

  • Body: full
  • Acid: medium
  • Origin: Portugal
  • Flavors: ripe blackberry, raspberry, cinnamon, candied apple, star anise
  • Pairs well with these foods: blue cheese, cherry desserts, bittersweet or dark chocolate, apples and apple desserts, nuts and nutty desserts
  • Try it with: Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

Sauternes Pairing (Noble Rot)

  • Body: light
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: France
  • Flavors: lemon curd, apricot, quince, honey, ginger
  • Pairs well with these foods: almonds and almond desserts, cake, custards, fruit and fruit desserts, blue cheese
  • Try it with: Vegan Apple Crisp

Sherry Pairing

  • Body: medium
  • Acid: high
  • Origin: Spain
  • Flavors: jackfruit, salt, preserved lemon, brazil nut, almond
  • Pairs well with these foods: almonds, artichoke hearts, Gouda cheese, creamy chocolate desserts, fried food, green olives, soup, tapenade

All about Vegan Wine

Wine isn’t always classified as vegan or even vegetarian. Common “fining” agents used to clarify wine include: casein (milk protein), albumin (egg whites), gelatin (animal protein), and isinglass (fish bladder protein). These animal-based proteins are typically filtered out before bottling but some animal-protein particles inevitably slip through. Wines that use these fining agents are not vegan, and-depending on the original fining agent-may not be vegetarian.

Luckily, not all wines use these fining agents. Some winemakers choose clay-based fining agents or activated charcoal to create their wines, which guarantees that they’re vegetarian and vegan-friendly. Additionally, some winemakers also allow their wines to self-settle for a longer period of time so they can naturally clarify, rather than introducing a fining agent. Both of these options work for vegetarians and vegans.

Unfortunately, wine labels are not required by US law to disclose: if they’re vegan or vegetarian, what ingredients are used, or how they were clarified. There is intense debate in legislative circles around ingredient labeling in wine and beer, so as the public continues to demand transparency, I would anticipate this law will evolve. Some winemakers are choosing to voluntarily include this information but the vast majority do not label ingredients yet.

So, how can you tell if wine is vegan? Speaking candidly, it can be challenging. I recommend consulting with your local or favorite wine shops, doing a quick Google search of your favorite vineyards and potential purchases, and consulting the Barnivore. The Barnivore is a comprehensive database that covers vegan wine, beer, and liquor. Lastly, if you find exceptional vegan wines, spread the word! The more that wine shops and winemakers hear customers demand for ingredient labeling and vegan wines, the more likely that they are to start producing wines that everyone can drink.

Final Thoughts on Wine Pairing

Pairing wine with vegan (or vegetarian) food is an art, not a science. There are no right answers. Good wine pairings are about what you like — not what Plant & Vine, your local sommelier, or a wine club recommends. I’m here to encourage you to learn about wine and to get you excited about trying different combinations that will help you figure out what you like. I also recognize that not everyone has the time or passion to turn wine pairings into a personal art, so I’m also here to take the work off you and point you in the right direction. I would love to hear about your successes (and even any fumblings along the way) as you explore the world of wine pairing.

If you want to take your wine knowledge to the next level, check out my recommended wine drinker books. If you’re drinking wine regularly but not decanting it and want to learn more, check out my best wine decanter guide.

Read more: 30 Tasty Vegan Side Dishes

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